Dec 062012
 

Mother Nature has been really unfair with me. It has given me two strong interests in life: building things and information security. Once that was done, my doom was sealed and I’ve become a infosec defense guy. Nowadays this is one of the worst fate possible in computer science.

Today, this burden is really hard to wear. I know some of you will try to encourage me by saying this like:

It is not that bad. You could have been a Microsoft Exchange administrator.

And they are right. I’m doing really interesting things and taking a lot of pleasure at doing them. The point is not here. It is on the way information security community is evolving. It is cheering the offensive guys and as everybody want to be loved this lead to absurd and dangerous behaviors. And this is just becoming worse every day.

My last example is a conference given at Blackhat by Antonios Atlasis, Chief/Research at Center for strategic cyberspace + security science. The talk is advertised on CSCSS website which is a first sign of the importance of infosec circus for this kind of entity. But let’s get back to the main issue. The talk is showing some results of a study made by Mr. Atlasis on security impact of IPv6 extension headers. Among the result, successful evasion of two well-known IDS: snort and Suricata. And this completely pissed me off.

I’m one of the developer of Suricata and we never have been contacted by the guy before the event. So to sum up, a guy working for a not-for-profit organization is publishing attacks on software without even having warn the editor before. That’s just insane. And this show, the current spirit in information security:

I publish vulnerability without warning editor to maximize the impact of my talk

The worse thing is that I know that a possible defense will be:

I’m a good guy cause I could have sell it as a O-day

That’s not a real excuse. O-day sellers are just blackhats in suit. Or to be more accurate as I know some of them don’t wear suit, blackhats doing public business thanks to the legal void on the selling of cyberweapons. A guy working for a not-for-profit organization has to be a whitehat. I think this is even mandatory in the USA as it seems the not-for-profit organization must act for public good.

Yes, being a defensive guy is not fair. You build huge and complex structure and all the light (and sometime the money) is for the one who demonstrate how one of the thousand engines you’ve build can be abused. And this is the climax when the guy disrespects you by not letting you a chance to fix the issue before it goes public.

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